Strange Angel Review, Season 2: Episode 1 – The Fool

Season 2 of Strange Angel opens with a two year time jump and a celebration as Jack and his team of rocket scientist are celebrating a year in business and their growing relationship with the US Military.


Jack and Susan have moved from their small home from season one into a mansion in a wealthy part of Pasadena. Jack is troubled by nightmares of a dragon attempting to break down the door.


At the same time, the Agape Lodge have been driven from their home by the local Priest, his congregation and Susan’s stepfather Virgil. While talking to Alfred, the head of the lodge, Jack invites them to move into the mansion with Susan, Jack and Susan’s younger sister Patty.


Alfred is reluctant, saying to Susan “I don’t think the house will be big enough for the both of them”. Whether he was referring to Jack and Alfred, Alfred and Susan or Susan, Jack and the lodge remains to be seen.


Across town, Ernest emerges from the hull of a ship having traveled away from Pasadena, Jack, and the Agape Lodge. A lost soul, Ernest heads back to the house where the Lodge had been to find it empty, enraged Ernest goes on a rampage including beating a store owner and ending up in jail.


During all of this, Jack’s partner and friend Richard is having relationship issues. Richard and his girlfriend Marisol, who may or may not still be a member of the Lodge, have grown closer since last season but are having to deal with the realities of an interracial relationship in 1940s Los Angeles. In a stark contrast, we see that the Agape Lodge is welcoming to people of all types and a haven for the misfits and outcast of the day.


The episode concludes with a raucous party, where the guest follow Jack is reciting Aleister Crowley’s Hymn to Pan*. And just as Jack says the final passage, there is a loud banging on the doors, the sound exactly like the sound from Jack’s nightmare.


Jack approaches the door and throws it open…. to find Ernest standing on the threshold, “Hey Jack” he says “long time no see”.


93


*Hymn to Pan by Aleister Crowley:
Thrill with lissome lust of the light,
O man! My man!
Come careering out of the night
Of Pan! Io Pan!
Io Pan! Io Pan! Come over the sea
From Sicily and from Arcady!
Roaming as Bacchus, with fauns and pards
And nymphs and satyrs for thy guards,
On a milk-white ass, come over the sea
To me, to me,
Come with Apollo in bridal dress
(Shepherdess and pythoness)
Come with Artemis, silken shod,
And wash thy white thigh, beautiful God,
In the moon of the woods, on the marble mount,
The dimpled dawn of the amber fount!
Dip the purple of passionate prayer
In the crimson shrine, the scarlet snare,
The soul that startles in eyes of blue
To watch thy wantonness weeping through
The tangled grove, the gnarled bole
Of the living tree that is spirit and soul
And body and brain — come over the sea,
(Io Pan! Io Pan!)
Devil or god, to me, to me,
My man! my man!
Come with trumpets sounding shrill
Over the hill!
Come with drums low muttering
From the spring!
Come with flute and come with pipe!
Am I not ripe?
I, who wait and writhe and wrestle
With air that hath no boughs to nestle
My body, weary of empty clasp,
Strong as a lion and sharp as an asp —
Come, O come!
I am numb
With the lonely lust of devildom.
Thrust the sword through the galling fetter,
All-devourer, all-begetter;
Give me the sign of the Open Eye,
And the token erect of thorny thigh,
And the word of madness and mystery,
O Pan! Io Pan!
Io Pan! Io Pan Pan! Pan Pan! Pan,
I am a man:
Do as thou wilt, as a great god can,
O Pan! Io Pan!
Io Pan! Io Pan Pan! I am awake
In the grip of the snake.
The eagle slashes with beak and claw;
The gods withdraw:
The great beasts come, Io Pan! I am borne
To death on the horn
Of the Unicorn.
I am Pan! Io Pan! Io Pan Pan! Pan!
I am thy mate, I am thy man,
Goat of thy flock, I am gold, I am god,
Flesh to thy bone, flower to thy rod.
With hoofs of steel I race on the rocks
Through solstice stubborn to equinox.
And I rave; and I rape and I rip and I rend
Everlasting, world without end,
Mannikin, maiden, Maenad, man,
In the might of Pan.
Io Pan! Io Pan Pan! Pan! Io Pan!


*Crowley, Aleister. “Hymn to Pan.” Hymn to Pan – Book 4 – The Libri of Aleister Crowley – Hermetic Library, hermetic.com/crowley/book-4/hymn.

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